Jamiesons Dictionary of Scots: The Story of the First Historical Dictionary of the Scots Language

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Oxford: Oxford University Press, Derrick McClure.

Susan Rennie

Edinburgh: Birlinn, The Scots did not invent modern lexicography, either, though they have been central to its evolution. In turn, the books under review here advocate that lexicography. The rich tradition of Scots lexicography is susceptible to study at dramatically different scales, as the books in tandem prove. Iseabail Macleod and J. Both dictionaries have been united electronically and can be searched as the Dictionary of the Scots Language DSL on the internet www.

The ausbau of present-day Scots. The Essential Scots Dictionary. Acronyms browser? Full browser? To enlighten.

To come alist. To recover from faintness or decay, applied both to animals and vegetables; to recover from a swoon, S. ALYTE, adv.


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A little. Grim, ghastly. Perhaps from all , Moes. To ally. Complaynt S. Only, solely, S. Together, in a state of union. From all , A.

Giddy, volatile; "An alle-volie chield," a volatile fellow, S. Common, universal.

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llamfelpsuamoc.tk | Jamieson's Dictionary of Scots | | Susan Rennie | Boeken

The alder, a tree, S. ALLER, adv. Wholly, entirely, altogether. Aller-hale , a pleonasm. The same with Allaris. Allowed, admitted.

The origins of the Scots language - in English

Altogether, thoroughly. Gawan and Gol. All kind of, Aw kin kind , S. In a great degree, beyond comparison. To approve of, generally with the prep. To praise, to commend. Although, S. Constantly, progressive, applied to time. Maitland Poems. Thus denominated, because whistles of this kind were originally imported from Almanie , i. An almoner, or dispenser of alms.

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Anciently a place where alms were deposited or distributed; in latter times used to denote a press or cupboard, where utensils for house keeping are laid up; the same with E. Alms, S. Almesse , O. ALPE, s. An elephant. Alpes bon , ivory. Every where.

Jamieson's Dictionary of Scots: The Story of the First Historical Dictionary of the Scots Language

ALRY, adj. For its different senses, V. Apparently a watch-tower, or the highest part of a castle. ALS, conj. As; generally employed in the first part of a comparison; " Als fers as a lyoun," i. From A.

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Also, in the same manner. Sua , Alsua. As much. As soon, with as subjoined. ALSUA, adv. From all , and swith , quickly, q. Although; notwithstanding, however. Almost, S. Among; amang , S. At intervals, occasionally. An embassy, as denoting the persons sent considered collectively. AMBRY, s. A press in which the provision for the daily use of a family in the country is locked up, S.

To mitigate, to appease. Green, verdant; probably written ameraud. Embers; aumers, S. To AMIT, v. To admonish, to counsel.

Further Reading

Loveknots, garlands. To move with anger, to vex, to excite. A misfortune. Noose, fastening; probably the same with Ham-shackel , q. To AN, v. To appropriate, to allot as one's own. Sir Tristrem. To owe, to be indebted to.